Automating Software Development Using Artificial Intelligence

This week I gave a research seminar at Dalhousie University and at Mount Allison University on “Automating Software Development Using Artificial Intelligence (AI).” The intersection of AI and Software Engineering is an active research area and has lead to a number of effective and novel applications of machine learning, metaheuristic algorithms and deep learning. Many of these applications of AI to software development can be categorized as:

  1. Automation of software development activities including the creation of software artifacts (e.g., software test generation)
  2. Recommendation systems to assist software developers improve their performance (e.g., recommended code for review)

Not all Software Engineering research problems can be suitably addressed by AI techniques. A good first step to determine if a given software development problem can be addressed with AI is to see if it can be re-framed in terms of optimization, classification, prediction, etc. That is, can it be re-framed in terms of the type of problems that AI methods are effective at solving?

To find out more about the Software Quality Research Lab‘s work in this area please see the abstract and slides from my talk below. Continue reading

Predicting Mutation Scores

Last week my MSc student, Kevin Jalbert, presented his early thesis results at the Workshop on Realizing Artificial Intelligence Synergies in Software Engineering (RAISE 2012). The workshop took place in Zurich Switzerland and was colocated with ICSE 2012. The title of the presentation (and the paper that appears in the proceedings) was “Predicting Mutation Score Using Source Code and Test Suite Metrics.” The paper was awarded the Best Paper Award at the workshop.

Mutation testing can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of test suites and can also be used as an oracle during the creation or improvement of test suites. Mutation testing works by creating many versions of a program each with a single syntactic fault. These program versions are created using mutation operators which are based on an existing fault taxonomy (i.e., a set of known fault types that we are trying to find during testing). One mutation operator, Relational Operator Replacement (ROR), could create a new mutant version of the program in which one of the instance of a relational operator (e.g., <) is replaced with a different operator. For example, line 3 of the following Java source  code: Continue reading

Software Testing Tools for Concurrency

As the use of concurrency in software increases there are more software testing tools being developed in both industry an academia. Below is a fairly comprehensive list of tools (mainly for Java):
  • ConTest – IBM concurrent testing tool that inserts random delays into Java bytecode
  • ConAn – a thread testing tool for Java
  • CHESS – a Microsoft tool for concurrent testing in Visual Studio
  • CalFuzzer – an active testing framework
  • ConMAn – mutation testing tool for concurrent programs written in Java
  • Continue reading